Monumental Bronzes

His public commissions include one of Texas's proudest monuments and one of the largest equestrian sculptures in the world, the phenomenal Mustangs of Las Colinas. 

Seven years in production.

 The Mustangs were unveiled in 1984 and have been a focal point of the greater Dallas / Ft. Worth area.

The sculpture has won Rob many awards. 

 

The Fallon Monument is located in San Jose, in California, and the Ben Carpenter sculpture is also in Las, Colinas, not far from the Mustangs.

 

Over the years Rob has been asked to create many such monumental pieces, but they require so much time to produce, he is reluctant to take on these projects, preferring to spend his time in the wilderness areas, making smaller pieces direct from the wildlife that surrounds his bush-camp home. 

The Mustangs from the air
The Mustangs from the air

This beautiful photo of the Mustangs was taken by our good friend Mr Eric Johnson, of Dallas, Texas.

The Mustangs from the front
The Mustangs from the front

Rob with his Mustangs Las Colinas
Rob with his Mustangs Las Colinas

The Mustangs from the air
The Mustangs from the air

This beautiful photo of the Mustangs was taken by our good friend Mr Eric Johnson, of Dallas, Texas.

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Rob with Fondaria Mariani staff
Rob with Fondaria Mariani staff

Thomas Fallon raising the first  American flag in San Hose
Thomas Fallon raising the first American flag in San Hose

Thomas Fallon at the Mariani foundry
Thomas Fallon at the Mariani foundry

Rob with Fondaria Mariani staff
Rob with Fondaria Mariani staff

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Rob working on Ben Carpenter
Rob working on Ben Carpenter

Assembling the bronze at the foundry
Assembling the bronze at the foundry

Making a bronze of this size requires skilled artisans to complete the process.

Ben Carpenter
Ben Carpenter

Rob working on Ben Carpenter
Rob working on Ben Carpenter

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The Mustangs 
of Las Colinas

Ben Carpenter of Irving, Texas, came to see my work during one of his safaris to Kenya. Ben became a collector of my bronzes and then later he asked me to make a herd of horses for a property development on his 20 square mile ranch. 

To cut a long, and interesting story short, I was commissioned to make a herd of nine,  one and a half times life-size horses, running through a river. 

These were to represent the original Mustangs from that part of the world which were actually Spanish Andalusian horses.

I designed the entire sculpture including the four hundred foot river, and the fountain jets under the hoofs of the horses in the water. 

 

 This sculpture took me seven and a half years to make and was my life for that period. 

Two further years of installation and at last the opening  at Williams square in 1984. 

This was the fruition of Ben Carpenters’  vision of making a development on his property: a beautiful environment in which to live and work, and is now known as Las Colinas. 

Thomas Fallon monument
 

The monument depicts the raising of the first United States flag in California, in July 1846, by Captain Thomas Fallon. 

The gentleman with him on the second horse simply depicts a subordinate compatriot.

The piece is one and one half times life size, and is 14 ft from the top of the Captains head to the ground.

In those days, whilst these men were military officers they preferred to wear buckskin clothing than regular military uniforms.

 

The City of San Jose, in California, commissioned the piece to represent this period of American History in claiming California as an addition to the already present United States.

Ben Carpenter

 

After Ben Carpenter passed away, his family asked me to make a sculpture of him. The twice life-size sculpture is in Las Colinas, not far from the Mustang sculpture at Williams Square.

 

I came to know Ben well, during our work together over the Mustangs.  It was a  great privilege to be asked to make this piece.